Music Nerdery.

I listen to a lot of Music.

Posts Tagged ‘Movie

First came the “A Tribe Called Quest” Documentary. Now Q-Tip doesnt approve. Let the Drama and Bullsh*t begin.

with 2 comments

Left to right: Phife Dawg, Q-Tip, Jarobi White & Ali Shaheed Muhammad

Imagine my excitement when I heard that the legendary ATCQ were reuniting for a couple of shows a year back. Anytime a relevant band reunites, there’s always spark of hope in the deepest part of a music nerds soul that something long-term/music will come of said reunion.  Then add-on the excitement of hearing that someone was attempting to document their reunion as well as their Overall Story and amazing contribution to Hip Hop. From there, I didn’t hear much on said Documentary until seeing a preview for it on YouTube (that you can watch below). Even though its out of sync, it gives a nice glimpse inside the project… and the overall theme of the Documentary. I was nerding out. The nerding compounded itself when I found out that Michael Rapaport had the film had to Sundance and Cannes Film Festival.

Until… (because there’s always an until/but) it came out that Q-Tip has a problem with the film. Everything about the film apparently. I mean, you do see that there is still obvious tension inside the ATCQ camp in the preview of the documentary… as would be expected. But it looks like Tip has nothing to do with the documentary at this point, and wants the same of you as well. From Tip’s Twitter and RapRadar:

I am not in support of the a tribe called quest documentary. The filmmaker should respect the band to the point of honoring the few requests that’s was made about the piece. The filmmaker should respect the band enough to honor our request regarding the film.

So here goes this. And I have no ideal what “this” is. I do suggest and implore Q-Tip clarify WTF is going on, so that everyone knows. For now, you can sit back, watch the Preview… and figure it out yourself.

Written by E

December 4, 2010 at 3:31 pm

First came the "A Tribe Called Quest" Documentary. Now Q-Tip doesnt approve. Let the Drama and Bullsh*t begin.

with 2 comments

Left to right: Phife Dawg, Q-Tip, Jarobi White & Ali Shaheed Muhammad

Imagine my excitement when I heard that the legendary ATCQ were reuniting for a couple of shows a year back. Anytime a relevant band reunites, there’s always spark of hope in the deepest part of a music nerds soul that something long-term/music will come of said reunion.  Then add-on the excitement of hearing that someone was attempting to document their reunion as well as their Overall Story and amazing contribution to Hip Hop. From there, I didn’t hear much on said Documentary until seeing a preview for it on YouTube (that you can watch below). Even though its out of sync, it gives a nice glimpse inside the project… and the overall theme of the Documentary. I was nerding out. The nerding compounded itself when I found out that Michael Rapaport had the film had to Sundance and Cannes Film Festival.

Until… (because there’s always an until/but) it came out that Q-Tip has a problem with the film. Everything about the film apparently. I mean, you do see that there is still obvious tension inside the ATCQ camp in the preview of the documentary… as would be expected. But it looks like Tip has nothing to do with the documentary at this point, and wants the same of you as well. From Tip’s Twitter and RapRadar:

I am not in support of the a tribe called quest documentary. The filmmaker should respect the band to the point of honoring the few requests that’s was made about the piece. The filmmaker should respect the band enough to honor our request regarding the film.

So here goes this. And I have no ideal what “this” is. I do suggest and implore Q-Tip clarify WTF is going on, so that everyone knows. For now, you can sit back, watch the Preview… and figure it out yourself.

Written by E

December 4, 2010 at 3:31 pm

Melissa Auf Der Maur Continues her epic streak of Amazing; Shows you how an Interview (addressing the “Hole” situation) should be done.

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If you want Hole... HER album is as close as you're going to get to it.

Oh Melissa, how do you maintain your awesome so flawlessly?

Not only has MAdM released her highly anticipated new multimedia album, Out Of Our Minds, and given you several amazing options for purchasing her album (man, check out this womans store… how can you NOT cop SOMETHING), she also gave us a glimpse into her long-awaited OOOM project a few days ago at the legendary Silent Movie Theatre in the Fairfax District.
A cozy and intimate venue set inside a restored Movie House from the 1920s, Melissa and the director of the Out Of Our Mind Movie, Tony Stone, held Q&A and an after movie chill out session with all the free Beer and Coconut Juice and popcorn you could eat. Delightful, attentive, appreciative and somewhat shy about sharing her project with us for the first time…  MAdM had a chance to tell us a bit about OOOM…. how the title track came to her before she had even thought about doing the movie or the project as a whole; and how it inspired her…. her love of mythology, irish history, the occult, and its direct influence on both the movie and the album… the musical influences for the album which came from the Smiths, Fugazi, Morrissey, and others…  the artwork behind the graphic novel for OOOM, her plans for the future and her tour (she just wants to get through this and see where the rest takes her)…. and so much more that I’m forgetting right now, I’m sure. It was, however, a wonderful night.

Meanwhile, while unleashing all this awesome upon us, Melissa gave a stunning and wonderful interview to the Guardian (UK) where she gives you even more insight into her album, her plans for her music, and the whole situation behind the Hole Situation. Swipe Below:

Your new album, Out Of Our Minds, is also a comic book, a film, a live performance and a gallery. Can you tell us a bit more about it?
M: It started as a song but expanded into something I always wanted to do – unite visual and conceptual art with music. Something about the climate changing, the magic of the 21st century and the technology – it just felt like this was the time when I could start pushing out of the traditional box.

There’s so much nostalgia around music at the moment that you don’t often hear people talking about the present time as “magic”.
M: I think there are magic opportunities to do things new. I’ve always had a romantic idea about old and new clashing. I couldn’t have made this album 10 years ago. Artists produce great work when technology improves and I realised that I’m living in one of those times. I’m living in this magic moment where you can change everything. And as much as I consider myself an artist in thrall to the Victorian, pre-Raphaelite and renaissance periods, I’m actually a modernist at heart.

Why couldn’t you have done it until now?
M: I am a late bloomer. I was the last girl at school to get breasts and her period, so I’ve always been patient with my development. I’m also a big believer in getting an education to get somewhere. I loved school and have always referred to the Pumpkins and Hole as my university experience. And I think it’s important to represent mature women, not just 21-year-olds. I feel proud to be a 37-year-old veteran who continues to grow.

Let’s talk about Hole. How did it shape you?
M: It was a definite lesson in being human, co-existing with different people, and watching healing and destruction happen at the same time.

You hadn’t done much before you joined the band.
M: No, I was in school and had only played seven shows – all in my hometown. Reading festival was my first proper gig. Luckily I’ve aways been at ease with the unknown, whether it’s aliens, a through-the-looking-glass mentality, or loving hallucinogenics and David Lynch. It didn’t freak me out, entering a new planet called Hole. It was just another day, another trip.

How do you feel about this new guise?
M: I know nothing about the new guise. It’s complicated, but basically Courtney is an incredibly strong and intelligent woman with a lot of stuff to offer, and she should be releasing records and performing because she is magical at that. But I’m slightly confused. I believe it started as a solo record and ended up being a Hole record. Ultimately, she’s someone who’s going to do what she wants to do, so it’s not worth debating. I want her to be happy and, despite this turn of events, that’s still the way I feel. I hope she finds happiness and creative fulfilment.

Has it closed the door on you ever going back?
M: I told her I was concerned it would close the door. Not that any of us were ready to jump into a reunion. I mean I was not going to put the release of my record aside for that at all, but I wasn’t closing the door. But it confuses the legacy of Hole. Courtney’s the leader, but she and Eric co-founded the band, and they should discuss it more in terms of what it means to the whole … of Hole.

What’s your take on the commercial side of music right now?
M: Well, the best thing that happened to me was Capital Records imploding so I could begin to learn about the music business and take responsibility for all of the mistakes that have been made for all musicians. And if I’m really lucky I’ll be able to use all of this learning to help other artists and be able to release other people’s projects through my label.

What do you think about artists signing to major labels?
M: Something like 5% of new acts make money. So that seems like a really bad business plan. It’s not a system that’s going to survive unless you are Beyoncé. In the US, it’s going to come down to a bunch of millionaire CEOs and Beyoncés and Jay-Zs. That’s fine, but people like us won’t be able to exist. I found partners in Canada to help support the release of my album. They are women that love film, art and music and decided to start this company.

Where does the money come from?
M: It’s like personal, artistic philanthropy. I think there are plenty of big business people who may choose to do that, and it could be a really great way to save the arts. Anybody out there with some extra money, find an artist as a pet.

We have a handful of high-profile female pop stars here at the moment …
M: There definitely is a rise of cool women.

But at the same time, the press tends to lump them all together.
M: Unfortunately it just says that women are still far behind in terms of equal representation. I think we’ve made leaps and bounds since my mother’s generation. I have high hopes for the feminine era of 2010. I think the 21st century is going to be incredible. Even as we destroy mother nature, even men’s hearts are weeping for the feminine side and the giving of life. A lot of beautiful men are going to step up and represent their feminine side and the world’s feminine side.

Is what you do feminine?
M: Definitely. Am I feminine? Yes, although I did look like a boy until I was 25. I was pretty androgynous for as long as a woman can be. Have I become more feminine? Yes. But do I prefer frontmen like Danzig and Morrissey over any woman? Yes. So I think I like androgynous, feminine forces. Ozzy Osbourne and Jimmy Page – they’re witchy, feminine men.

Do you think so? A lot of people would say they’re sexual, macho men.
M: To me it seems more like magic than sex. Maybe I have an idealistic perspective because I don’t see the world through sex glasses, I see them through sensual glasses. So somebody might be incredibly sexual but I see it as this amazing sensual thing!

You sound like a real optimist.
M: It’s mainly because I’m really up for the challenge. I really, really am. I won’t stop working and most of it is in hope of things like beauty, love and sharing. In the 90s, everyone used to say, ‘Melissa’s a hippy’. And I feel like in the 21st century I’m a realist. I’m not a hippy. I’m just trying to enter the future with utopia in mind, you know?

Damn. Thats handling yourself with class. Seriously. Hats off to you Melissa.
Anyway, pick up her amazing new album. Frankly and personally, it’s better than whatever Courtney is up to. LoL
(not nice, I know.)

Melissa Auf Der Maur Continues her epic streak of Amazing; Shows you how an Interview (addressing the "Hole" situation) should be done.

leave a comment »

If you want Hole... HER album is as close as you're going to get to it.

Oh Melissa, how do you maintain your awesome so flawlessly?

Not only has MAdM released her highly anticipated new multimedia album, Out Of Our Minds, and given you several amazing options for purchasing her album (man, check out this womans store… how can you NOT cop SOMETHING), she also gave us a glimpse into her long-awaited OOOM project a few days ago at the legendary Silent Movie Theatre in the Fairfax District.
A cozy and intimate venue set inside a restored Movie House from the 1920s, Melissa and the director of the Out Of Our Mind Movie, Tony Stone, held Q&A and an after movie chill out session with all the free Beer and Coconut Juice and popcorn you could eat. Delightful, attentive, appreciative and somewhat shy about sharing her project with us for the first time…  MAdM had a chance to tell us a bit about OOOM…. how the title track came to her before she had even thought about doing the movie or the project as a whole; and how it inspired her…. her love of mythology, irish history, the occult, and its direct influence on both the movie and the album… the musical influences for the album which came from the Smiths, Fugazi, Morrissey, and others…  the artwork behind the graphic novel for OOOM, her plans for the future and her tour (she just wants to get through this and see where the rest takes her)…. and so much more that I’m forgetting right now, I’m sure. It was, however, a wonderful night.

Meanwhile, while unleashing all this awesome upon us, Melissa gave a stunning and wonderful interview to the Guardian (UK) where she gives you even more insight into her album, her plans for her music, and the whole situation behind the Hole Situation. Swipe Below:

Your new album, Out Of Our Minds, is also a comic book, a film, a live performance and a gallery. Can you tell us a bit more about it?
M: It started as a song but expanded into something I always wanted to do – unite visual and conceptual art with music. Something about the climate changing, the magic of the 21st century and the technology – it just felt like this was the time when I could start pushing out of the traditional box.

There’s so much nostalgia around music at the moment that you don’t often hear people talking about the present time as “magic”.
M: I think there are magic opportunities to do things new. I’ve always had a romantic idea about old and new clashing. I couldn’t have made this album 10 years ago. Artists produce great work when technology improves and I realised that I’m living in one of those times. I’m living in this magic moment where you can change everything. And as much as I consider myself an artist in thrall to the Victorian, pre-Raphaelite and renaissance periods, I’m actually a modernist at heart.

Why couldn’t you have done it until now?
M: I am a late bloomer. I was the last girl at school to get breasts and her period, so I’ve always been patient with my development. I’m also a big believer in getting an education to get somewhere. I loved school and have always referred to the Pumpkins and Hole as my university experience. And I think it’s important to represent mature women, not just 21-year-olds. I feel proud to be a 37-year-old veteran who continues to grow.

Let’s talk about Hole. How did it shape you?
M: It was a definite lesson in being human, co-existing with different people, and watching healing and destruction happen at the same time.

You hadn’t done much before you joined the band.
M: No, I was in school and had only played seven shows – all in my hometown. Reading festival was my first proper gig. Luckily I’ve aways been at ease with the unknown, whether it’s aliens, a through-the-looking-glass mentality, or loving hallucinogenics and David Lynch. It didn’t freak me out, entering a new planet called Hole. It was just another day, another trip.

How do you feel about this new guise?
M: I know nothing about the new guise. It’s complicated, but basically Courtney is an incredibly strong and intelligent woman with a lot of stuff to offer, and she should be releasing records and performing because she is magical at that. But I’m slightly confused. I believe it started as a solo record and ended up being a Hole record. Ultimately, she’s someone who’s going to do what she wants to do, so it’s not worth debating. I want her to be happy and, despite this turn of events, that’s still the way I feel. I hope she finds happiness and creative fulfilment.

Has it closed the door on you ever going back?
M: I told her I was concerned it would close the door. Not that any of us were ready to jump into a reunion. I mean I was not going to put the release of my record aside for that at all, but I wasn’t closing the door. But it confuses the legacy of Hole. Courtney’s the leader, but she and Eric co-founded the band, and they should discuss it more in terms of what it means to the whole … of Hole.

What’s your take on the commercial side of music right now?
M: Well, the best thing that happened to me was Capital Records imploding so I could begin to learn about the music business and take responsibility for all of the mistakes that have been made for all musicians. And if I’m really lucky I’ll be able to use all of this learning to help other artists and be able to release other people’s projects through my label.

What do you think about artists signing to major labels?
M: Something like 5% of new acts make money. So that seems like a really bad business plan. It’s not a system that’s going to survive unless you are Beyoncé. In the US, it’s going to come down to a bunch of millionaire CEOs and Beyoncés and Jay-Zs. That’s fine, but people like us won’t be able to exist. I found partners in Canada to help support the release of my album. They are women that love film, art and music and decided to start this company.

Where does the money come from?
M: It’s like personal, artistic philanthropy. I think there are plenty of big business people who may choose to do that, and it could be a really great way to save the arts. Anybody out there with some extra money, find an artist as a pet.

We have a handful of high-profile female pop stars here at the moment …
M: There definitely is a rise of cool women.

But at the same time, the press tends to lump them all together.
M: Unfortunately it just says that women are still far behind in terms of equal representation. I think we’ve made leaps and bounds since my mother’s generation. I have high hopes for the feminine era of 2010. I think the 21st century is going to be incredible. Even as we destroy mother nature, even men’s hearts are weeping for the feminine side and the giving of life. A lot of beautiful men are going to step up and represent their feminine side and the world’s feminine side.

Is what you do feminine?
M: Definitely. Am I feminine? Yes, although I did look like a boy until I was 25. I was pretty androgynous for as long as a woman can be. Have I become more feminine? Yes. But do I prefer frontmen like Danzig and Morrissey over any woman? Yes. So I think I like androgynous, feminine forces. Ozzy Osbourne and Jimmy Page – they’re witchy, feminine men.

Do you think so? A lot of people would say they’re sexual, macho men.
M: To me it seems more like magic than sex. Maybe I have an idealistic perspective because I don’t see the world through sex glasses, I see them through sensual glasses. So somebody might be incredibly sexual but I see it as this amazing sensual thing!

You sound like a real optimist.
M: It’s mainly because I’m really up for the challenge. I really, really am. I won’t stop working and most of it is in hope of things like beauty, love and sharing. In the 90s, everyone used to say, ‘Melissa’s a hippy’. And I feel like in the 21st century I’m a realist. I’m not a hippy. I’m just trying to enter the future with utopia in mind, you know?

Damn. Thats handling yourself with class. Seriously. Hats off to you Melissa.
Anyway, pick up her amazing new album. Frankly and personally, it’s better than whatever Courtney is up to. LoL
(not nice, I know.)

Los Angeles: Movie Screening for Melissa Auf der Maur’s film “Out Of Our Minds…” Tonight! Free! GO!

leave a comment »

She is so damn cool.

Just a quick heads up people… Melissa Auf der Maur will be wrapping up her mini tour through LA today with the  official release for her movie for her Multimedia Album, “Out of Our Minds.” With Melissa set to be there, along with director Tony Stone and several other friends, its set to be good times.

Here goes all the info you’ll need:

  • Artist: MAdM – Melissa Auf der Maur
  • Date: Thursday, April 1st 2010
  • Time: 7:00pm
  • City: MAdM – Melissa Auf der Maur in Los Angeles
  • Venue: The Silent Movie Theatre
  • Address: 611 North Fairfax ave, LA CA, 90036
  • Country: US
  • Admission: FREE!
  • Age restrictions: All Ages
  • Notes: Q&A AND FULL OOOM PRESENTATION! DIRECTOR TONY STONE IN THE HOUSE TOO!

    “If you don’t make this, you’d better be DEAD or IN JAIL. And if you’re in jail…. BREAKOUUUUT.”
    ©The Simpsons.

Los Angeles: Movie Screening for Melissa Auf der Maur's film "Out Of Our Minds…" Tonight! Free! GO!

leave a comment »

She is so damn cool.

Just a quick heads up people… Melissa Auf der Maur will be wrapping up her mini tour through LA today with the  official release for her movie for her Multimedia Album, “Out of Our Minds.” With Melissa set to be there, along with director Tony Stone and several other friends, its set to be good times.

Here goes all the info you’ll need:

  • Artist: MAdM – Melissa Auf der Maur
  • Date: Thursday, April 1st 2010
  • Time: 7:00pm
  • City: MAdM – Melissa Auf der Maur in Los Angeles
  • Venue: The Silent Movie Theatre
  • Address: 611 North Fairfax ave, LA CA, 90036
  • Country: US
  • Admission: FREE!
  • Age restrictions: All Ages
  • Notes: Q&A AND FULL OOOM PRESENTATION! DIRECTOR TONY STONE IN THE HOUSE TOO!

    “If you don’t make this, you’d better be DEAD or IN JAIL. And if you’re in jail…. BREAKOUUUUT.”
    ©The Simpsons.