Music Nerdery.

I listen to a lot of Music.

Posts Tagged ‘Interviews

Bilal Oliver Breaks down tracks from his new album, “Airtight’s Revenge” | NPR Previews Entire album on their Site | American Tour Dates Announced.

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Yeah.

Sorry for the false start previously kids. My computer is being retarded right now.
Anyways, found some interesting video of Bilal going over and breaking down his new album, due out September 14, 2010. Going into detail about how things were written, created and came about, its great insight to an album you probably need to go buy.

Go ahead and check out this in-depth review at NPR (God I love you guys) and preview the album there, then check out the videos explaining the songs below.

Then you have your tourdates below.

Wednesday, September 15th – BOSTON, MA
Scullers Jazz Club

Saturday, September 18th – NEW YORK, NY
B.B. King’s Blues Club

Sunday, September 19th – WASHINGTON, D.C.
Birchmere

Monday, September 20th – NEW YORK, NY
Tillman’s (Acoustic)

Tuesday, September 21st – TORONTO
Revival

Thursday, September 23rd – OTTAWA
Revival

Saturday, September 25th – MONTREAL
La Sala Rossa

Thursday, October 14th – PORTLAND, OREGON
Someday Lounge

Saturday, October 16th – SEATTLE, WA
Nectar Lounge

Wednesday, October 20th – SACRAMENTO, CA
Harlos

Thursday, October 21st – SAN JOSE, CA
Landmark Ballroom

Friday, October 22nd – OAKLAND, CA
Yoshi’s Jazz Club

Saturday, October 23rd – OAKLAND, CA
Yoshi’s Jazz Club

Monday, October 27th – FULLERTON, CA
Common Wealth Lounge

Tuesday, October 28th – LOS ANGELES, CA
Echo Plex

Enjoy, dammit.

Written by E

September 12, 2010 at 8:00 pm

Mark Ronson in Studio with D’Angelo | New Lupe Fiasco Leaks.

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Oh, Word?

Well, it looks like D’Angelo is indeed still in the studio and actively recording… according to Mark Ronson, who was just recruited by D’Angelo to brainstorm and record tracks on this new phantom album that we hope comes into existence, eventually. You can read more about Mark Ronson and his encounter with D’Angelo by clicking here.

Complex

Meanwhile, it looks like another Lasers leak has made it to the internets. It’s not confirmed, but “Go To Sleep” is definitely a new track from Lupe, and its sounding fairly decent. If you don’t have that, you can click here for the download as well.

Tonight, I’m off to party with Questlove and J-Logic for Michael Jackson birthday.
Set to be great times.
See you when I recover.

Written by E

August 27, 2010 at 6:50 pm

Mark Ronson in Studio with D'Angelo | New Lupe Fiasco Leaks.

leave a comment »

Oh, Word?

Well, it looks like D’Angelo is indeed still in the studio and actively recording… according to Mark Ronson, who was just recruited by D’Angelo to brainstorm and record tracks on this new phantom album that we hope comes into existence, eventually. You can read more about Mark Ronson and his encounter with D’Angelo by clicking here.

Complex

Meanwhile, it looks like another Lasers leak has made it to the internets. It’s not confirmed, but “Go To Sleep” is definitely a new track from Lupe, and its sounding fairly decent. If you don’t have that, you can click here for the download as well.

Tonight, I’m off to party with Questlove and J-Logic for Michael Jackson birthday.
Set to be great times.
See you when I recover.

Written by E

August 27, 2010 at 6:50 pm

New In-Depth Interviews with Melissa Auf der Maur. Because I adore her.

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Auf der Maur in Nylon. Beautiful Interview.

Melissa in Venus. Win.

part 2

part 3.

So I made it easy for you. You can just go ahead and click on each photo to read the most recent reviews with Melissa Auf der Maur here. Nylon give you a peek at MAdM’s lovely home in upstate new york, while Venus sits down with her and digs a little deeper.

Interesting side note: Courtney has been hyping up Melissa at a few of her last shows, from several different reports (like this one here). I hope Courtney lets go of whatever beef she has with Eric (boy thats a long story), and just… do the old line up. I’d pay quality, QUALITY money for that one. lol.

Enjoy.

Written by E

August 10, 2010 at 5:05 pm

Random Thoughts: The Lauryn Hill and D’Angelo 2010 Interviews. Do you believe them tho?

with 3 comments

Lauryn Hill at the Harmony  Festival in June; courtesy of the  Harmony Festival

*waits for it*

So after holding my breath for so long that I almost passed out, suddenly, out the blue… two of my most beloved and most Missing in Action Musicians seem to have just popped up out the blue, and taken a long-awaited step back into the (media) light by giving their first sit-down interview in several years. Lauryn Hill interviews fairly often, but it always tends to go awry in some way, and in D’Angelo’s case, its been 10 years since he’s had anything to say.

I was on the vacation when all this popped off, but I was so eager to get home and read out what I heard were two fairly decent interviews that clearly hinted at returns to music within a reasonable amount of time. The thing is, with these two… you don’t know at this point anymore. I’m aware that D’Angelo is messing around in the studio, but supposedly he’s  been at it since late 2008 and we havent heard much other than the leaked “1000 Deaths” track. And Lauryn has been (rightfully) attending to the 5 children she’s had with Rohan Marley, the 4th child of Bob Marley.

Well start with Lauryn, since she seems to give us more insight as to whats going on.

Lauryn Hill took the stage at the Harmony Festival in Santa Rosa, Calif., just a few weeks ago. She’s barely performed at all in the U.S. in the past 10 years. The band was restless and loud behind her, almost drowning her out at times. She looked completely regal, even in a carnival balloon-style jumpsuit, with her hair blown out and dyed maroon to match. She pranced around the stage in huge heels, shouting directions to the band, as though they were in rehearsal. When she rapped, her words flew by so fast, it seemed she was barely breathing. But when the sound guy brought her mic up and the band would breathe for a moment, her voice soared over the crowd. It was the same voice I’d grown up with, just as raw and present and full of soul as I remembered.

The reputation that surrounds Hill is wild — it’s hard to know what to believe, because she does so few interviews. She’s got handlers on top of handlers, publicists and managers who, you think, will lead you to her, and then they turn out to be red herrings. My editor and I chased them all down during the weekend of the Harmony Festival. I was told by various people to not touch her, don’t look her in the eye; that instead of talking directly to you, she writes on a Post-It note and sticks it to your chest. I’ve also been told repeatedly not to call her “Lauryn” anything — she goes by Ms. Hill. This is the only rumor that turns out to be true, in my case. Because after her performance in Santa Rosa, when we ask Ms. Hill if we can ride with her back to the hotel and ask her some questions, she tells us to get in the car.

Lauryn Hill onstage at the Harmony Festival in Santa Rosa, Calif., on June 13.

I ask her the question her fans have been asking each other for years: Why did you stop putting out music?

“There were a number of different reasons,” she says. “But partly, the support system that I needed was not necessarily in place. There were things about myself, personal-growth things, that I had to go through in order to feel like it was worth it. In fact, as musicians and artists, it’s important we have an environment — and I guess when I say environment, I really mean the [music] industry, that really nurtures these gifts. Oftentimes, the machine can overlook the need to take care of the people who produce the sounds that have a lot to do with the health and well-being of society, or at least some aspect of society. And it’s important that people be given the time that they need to go through, to grow, so that the consciousness level of the general public is properly affected.  Oftentimes, I think people are forced to make decisions prematurely. And then that sound radiates.”

You can read the FULL interview HERE.


Meanwhile, the interview with D’Angelo was much more cut and dry. Not really acknowledging the arrest earlier for something I woulda did for free…. or really getting into details about where he’s at in his album creation…. D’ basically makes sure that we know he’s still alive, he misses Dilla dearly (we all do) and that we still need to care about him musically. Here’s his full interview below:

TheUrbanDaily: How are you?

D’Angelo: I’m good, man. I’m good.

TUD: What’s inspiring you lately?

D: I just got turned on to this group called Black Merda that I’m just kinda beating myself up over because I’d never heard of them before.  I think about a couple of months ago, my boy turned me on to them.  I’m just revisiting groups that are basically looked at like funk groups or funk artists, but I’m looking at it differently now.  These guys who were really trying to push the envelope back then, I think they were just a head of their time as far as black rock is concerned.

TUD: Oh, so Black Merda’s from back in the day?

D: Yeah!  Black Merda’s from 1969 or 1970 and they were on Chess Records.  I’m also listening to s**t like Rick James, The Bar-Kays… These guys were like black rock & roll.

TUD: In listening to stuff like Black Merda and thinking about the multi-dimensionality missing from today’s Black music, is this influencing the stuff that you’re doing now?

D: Uhh, yeah. Definitely. I think it’s just the whole over-influx of what is stereotypically seen as Black music today, or hip-hop today, or Black culture or what have you.  Just looking for alternative s**t that’s unquestionably, unmistakably Black, and doesn’t fit into this whole — what I feel is like minstrelsy almost.

TUD: Does it feel to you that in the past 10 years that Black difference has become almost impossible?  What used to be a rainbow of offerings 20 years ago seems to be different flavors of the same s**t.

D: I don’t think so.  I think it’s out there, but there’s a lot of folks, people in power, record executives or what have you, that are less willing to take chances on s**t that might be different. But I think there’s a underground bubbling up under. A lot of Black folks are trying to do different s**t or they wanna do different s**t. I don’t know the condition of what’s going on in the business right now, but they’re having a hard time cracking through. (Afro-Punk co-founder) Matthew Morgan turned me on to what he was doing probably a couple of years ago. I think it’s the s**t. I love it. One night we were at Raphael Saadiq’s studio and Bootsy Collins came through.  I was trying to get in touch with Angelo from Fishbone, but he gave me the DVD of the AfroPunk film. But I’d been branching out and picking up on Bad Brains and s**t like that.

TUD: Do you ever envision yourself coming a little closer to that collective, either performing at the festival or collaborating with those artists?

D: Yes. Definitely.

TUD: Not this year, but maybe next year.

D: Yeah. I’m really just focusing on getting this album together.

TUD:
We’ve touched on inspirations from the past, but are there any new artists who are inspiring you right now?

D: Yeah, but it’s funny. I don’t really want to get into that. I’m just kind of focusing on my s**t right now.

TUD: So in the midst of the creative process, you have to keep things very close and keep yourself sheltered from all the back and forth, from all the speculation and I completely understand that.  But what is it that you want folks to know about you, about your music.

D: I just want them to know that I’m coming. That’s all.  I’m in the kitchen and I’m cooking up something real nice.

My question is…
Do you really think this is gonna happen?
I think ive been asking this question once a year, every year… for the last 10 or 11 years.
I want to believe… but actions speak louder than words.
I guess we will see.

Enjoy.

Random Thoughts: The Lauryn Hill and D'Angelo 2010 Interviews. Do you believe them tho?

with 3 comments

Lauryn Hill at the Harmony  Festival in June; courtesy of the  Harmony Festival

*waits for it*

So after holding my breath for so long that I almost passed out, suddenly, out the blue… two of my most beloved and most Missing in Action Musicians seem to have just popped up out the blue, and taken a long-awaited step back into the (media) light by giving their first sit-down interview in several years. Lauryn Hill interviews fairly often, but it always tends to go awry in some way, and in D’Angelo’s case, its been 10 years since he’s had anything to say.

I was on the vacation when all this popped off, but I was so eager to get home and read out what I heard were two fairly decent interviews that clearly hinted at returns to music within a reasonable amount of time. The thing is, with these two… you don’t know at this point anymore. I’m aware that D’Angelo is messing around in the studio, but supposedly he’s  been at it since late 2008 and we havent heard much other than the leaked “1000 Deaths” track. And Lauryn has been (rightfully) attending to the 5 children she’s had with Rohan Marley, the 4th child of Bob Marley.

Well start with Lauryn, since she seems to give us more insight as to whats going on.

Lauryn Hill took the stage at the Harmony Festival in Santa Rosa, Calif., just a few weeks ago. She’s barely performed at all in the U.S. in the past 10 years. The band was restless and loud behind her, almost drowning her out at times. She looked completely regal, even in a carnival balloon-style jumpsuit, with her hair blown out and dyed maroon to match. She pranced around the stage in huge heels, shouting directions to the band, as though they were in rehearsal. When she rapped, her words flew by so fast, it seemed she was barely breathing. But when the sound guy brought her mic up and the band would breathe for a moment, her voice soared over the crowd. It was the same voice I’d grown up with, just as raw and present and full of soul as I remembered.

The reputation that surrounds Hill is wild — it’s hard to know what to believe, because she does so few interviews. She’s got handlers on top of handlers, publicists and managers who, you think, will lead you to her, and then they turn out to be red herrings. My editor and I chased them all down during the weekend of the Harmony Festival. I was told by various people to not touch her, don’t look her in the eye; that instead of talking directly to you, she writes on a Post-It note and sticks it to your chest. I’ve also been told repeatedly not to call her “Lauryn” anything — she goes by Ms. Hill. This is the only rumor that turns out to be true, in my case. Because after her performance in Santa Rosa, when we ask Ms. Hill if we can ride with her back to the hotel and ask her some questions, she tells us to get in the car.

Lauryn Hill onstage at the Harmony Festival in Santa Rosa, Calif., on June 13.

I ask her the question her fans have been asking each other for years: Why did you stop putting out music?

“There were a number of different reasons,” she says. “But partly, the support system that I needed was not necessarily in place. There were things about myself, personal-growth things, that I had to go through in order to feel like it was worth it. In fact, as musicians and artists, it’s important we have an environment — and I guess when I say environment, I really mean the [music] industry, that really nurtures these gifts. Oftentimes, the machine can overlook the need to take care of the people who produce the sounds that have a lot to do with the health and well-being of society, or at least some aspect of society. And it’s important that people be given the time that they need to go through, to grow, so that the consciousness level of the general public is properly affected.  Oftentimes, I think people are forced to make decisions prematurely. And then that sound radiates.”

You can read the FULL interview HERE.


Meanwhile, the interview with D’Angelo was much more cut and dry. Not really acknowledging the arrest earlier for something I woulda did for free…. or really getting into details about where he’s at in his album creation…. D’ basically makes sure that we know he’s still alive, he misses Dilla dearly (we all do) and that we still need to care about him musically. Here’s his full interview below:

TheUrbanDaily: How are you?

D’Angelo: I’m good, man. I’m good.

TUD: What’s inspiring you lately?

D: I just got turned on to this group called Black Merda that I’m just kinda beating myself up over because I’d never heard of them before.  I think about a couple of months ago, my boy turned me on to them.  I’m just revisiting groups that are basically looked at like funk groups or funk artists, but I’m looking at it differently now.  These guys who were really trying to push the envelope back then, I think they were just a head of their time as far as black rock is concerned.

TUD: Oh, so Black Merda’s from back in the day?

D: Yeah!  Black Merda’s from 1969 or 1970 and they were on Chess Records.  I’m also listening to s**t like Rick James, The Bar-Kays… These guys were like black rock & roll.

TUD: In listening to stuff like Black Merda and thinking about the multi-dimensionality missing from today’s Black music, is this influencing the stuff that you’re doing now?

D: Uhh, yeah. Definitely. I think it’s just the whole over-influx of what is stereotypically seen as Black music today, or hip-hop today, or Black culture or what have you.  Just looking for alternative s**t that’s unquestionably, unmistakably Black, and doesn’t fit into this whole — what I feel is like minstrelsy almost.

TUD: Does it feel to you that in the past 10 years that Black difference has become almost impossible?  What used to be a rainbow of offerings 20 years ago seems to be different flavors of the same s**t.

D: I don’t think so.  I think it’s out there, but there’s a lot of folks, people in power, record executives or what have you, that are less willing to take chances on s**t that might be different. But I think there’s a underground bubbling up under. A lot of Black folks are trying to do different s**t or they wanna do different s**t. I don’t know the condition of what’s going on in the business right now, but they’re having a hard time cracking through. (Afro-Punk co-founder) Matthew Morgan turned me on to what he was doing probably a couple of years ago. I think it’s the s**t. I love it. One night we were at Raphael Saadiq’s studio and Bootsy Collins came through.  I was trying to get in touch with Angelo from Fishbone, but he gave me the DVD of the AfroPunk film. But I’d been branching out and picking up on Bad Brains and s**t like that.

TUD: Do you ever envision yourself coming a little closer to that collective, either performing at the festival or collaborating with those artists?

D: Yes. Definitely.

TUD: Not this year, but maybe next year.

D: Yeah. I’m really just focusing on getting this album together.

TUD:
We’ve touched on inspirations from the past, but are there any new artists who are inspiring you right now?

D: Yeah, but it’s funny. I don’t really want to get into that. I’m just kind of focusing on my s**t right now.

TUD: So in the midst of the creative process, you have to keep things very close and keep yourself sheltered from all the back and forth, from all the speculation and I completely understand that.  But what is it that you want folks to know about you, about your music.

D: I just want them to know that I’m coming. That’s all.  I’m in the kitchen and I’m cooking up something real nice.

My question is…
Do you really think this is gonna happen?
I think ive been asking this question once a year, every year… for the last 10 or 11 years.
I want to believe… but actions speak louder than words.
I guess we will see.

Enjoy.

Written by E

July 9, 2010 at 4:57 pm